Some good news from the EU

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Straight bananas notwithstanding, sometimes Eurocrats do make the right decisions. Two excellent examples have emerged this week: the ruling by the EU Court of Justice that if you buy software, you own it and the decision by the European Parliament to reject the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (Acta). The first of these may sound a little …

Why David Aaronovitch is wrong about Wikipedia and SOPA

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Journalist David Aaronovitch has a full page opinion article in The Times today, which I can’t link to as it isn’t openly available online, in which he complains that “There’s nothing noble in this Wiki blackout”. Although the article is ostensibly about the decision by Wikipedia to join the anti-SOPA blackout, which he calls “self …

Study finds that filesharing is about convenience, not unwillingness to pay

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Courtesy of an article in El Reg, I discovered an interesting report prepared by US think-tank American Assembly and Columbia University. Rather drily titled “Copyright Infringement and Enforcement in the US“, it’s a summarised set of results from an extensive survey of the America public. Obviously, the US isn’t the UK and some of the …

Copyright reform, from a centre-right perspective

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I had a slightly back-handed compliment the other day. Former Pirate Party UK leader, Andrew Robinson, commented on Twitter, “For any PPUK people who automatically assume Conservatives = The Bad Guys, follow @MarkGoodge (& read his blog) for a pleasant surprise.” Now, I’m no abolitionist as far as Intellectual Property is concerned, and I certainly …