A bit more government non-communication

About a month ago* I wrote about the Home Office’s non-response to my FOI request asking for details of information given to Communication Service Providers (CSPs) about the Communications Data Bill. As you can see from that article, and the request itself, the request was refused. So I asked for an internal review into their handling of one section of it.

Specifically, I challenged their refusal to provide me with copies of documentation supplied to CSPs. This is what I wrote:

I feel that your justification for refusing to release copies of documentation supplied to CSPs is not supportable. CSPs are not law enforcement operators, and any information supplied to them must, of necessity, be widely disseminated among their technical staff in order for it to be evaluated and implemented. Unless all members of CSP staff and their contractors are required to sign an undertaking committing them to maintaining confidentiality, there can be no expectation that the material will not be made public in any case via other means. There is, therefore, no reason not to supply it to me directly.

The response to my internal review arrived today. As expected, the review has upheld the original decision to withhold the information. It would have been surprising had it not done so, and I’m not particularly disappointed that it has. But the review has itself revealed a bit more that we didn’t previously know, and that’s useful information even without the data that’s been withheld. Paragraph 12 of the response states

With regard to the information supplied to CSPs/ISPs, I have established that due to the sensitive nature of the information only certain individuals within the companies are able to view it. Mr Goodge’s contention that the information is disseminated widely within the companies is therefore incorrect.

Again, that’s not entirely surprising, and to be honest my initial contention otherwise was a little disingenuous. What I was really after – and got – was written confirmation of the fact that the information has been supplied under security restrictions. But the review response went on to tell me something that, while still not all that surprising, wasn’t something I’d been fishing for. In paragraph 13, I was told

I can confirm that at least some of the information was supplied by or relates to one of the security bodies listed in section 23(3) of the Act.

“The Act”, in this context, means the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and section 23(3) lists some organisations which are effectively exempt from it. That list comprises, effectively, the intelligence services (MI5, MI6 and GCHQ), the National Criminal Intelligence Service (NCIS) and the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) as well as various tribunals relating to them. Given that the tribunals are unlikely to be the source of any information, that means that at least one of the crime or intelligence agencies have contributed to it.

That being the case, it means that this particular issue is genuinely impenetrable via freedom of information legislation. There’s a blanket opt-out for anything related to the intelligence and serious crime agencies, and no internal review or appeal to the ICO can change that.

That doesn’t mean the exercise has been worthless, though. We have learned a few things:

  • The Home Office has issued information to some CSPs/ISPs related to Internet traffic monitoring.
  • That information has been supplied under security restrictions.
  • The recipients of the information do not want to be identified because they fear that it will damage their commercial reputation.

You can draw your own conclusions about what that means in practice. One thing is certain, though, and that’s that it’s going to be deeply unpopular with the electorate.

* Any article about an FOI request usually begins with the words “About a month ago”, because that’s how long it takes to get an answer.

Evesham bridge closure – traffic plan

We now know the chosen traffic management plan for the duration of the Evesham Abbey Bridge reconstruction work. As I blogged about last month, there were five options originally considered, of which two went forward for public consultation. One of those has now been selected.

It’s probably no surprise that the chosen option is to use Oat Street, with Mill Street becoming two-way from the junction with Bridge Street to the junction with Oat Street. That was option 4 in the original list, and Option One on the public consultation. It was backed by 65% of those responding to the consultation, as well as being the preferred option of the Town Council.

As well as choosing between the two options in the consultation, respondents were also give the opportunity to make alternative suggestions. Again, it’s probably no surprise that the two most commonly suggested alternative schemes were either to reinstate two-way traffic along Swan lane, or to reverse the flow in Swan Lane and Oat Street (options 2 and 5 in the original documents). These were rejected for essentially the same reasons that they didn’t make it through to the final consultation, as well as opposition from the police and emergency services.

Personally, I think that the right choice has been made. Given that people are more likely to be walking into town than driving while the bridge is closed, keeping Bridge Street free of traffic becomes even more important. And, although it hasn’t, to be honest, been communicated very well to the public, having seen the original plans and heard some further comments from the county’s Highways department I’m convinced that two-way traffic along Swan Lane and reversing the flow are impractical.

There’s one aspect of the plan which hasn’t been decided yet, and that’s what to do with the junction between Mill Street and Mill Bank. Closing the junction between the two will ease traffic flow, as otherwise there would be a need for three-way traffic lights on the corner instead of just two-way lights without it. Against that, closing it will force all traffic that would otherwise use it to reach Workman Bridge to instead go west along Swan Lane to the High Street and then back down Oat Street, thus increasing congestion in that area.

I can see the benefits of both options, but personally I’d prefer the junction to remain open. One of the big advantages of that is that it gives users of Chapel Street car park a route out of the town centre, via Conduit Hill and Mill Bank, during the bridge closure without needing to use the High Street. That particular car park is fairly lightly used at the moment, but if it gave drivers the benefit of avoiding some of the worst of the congestion during the closure then people would be more inclined to use it. And that in turn would benefit traffic flow further west as it would help minimise the pressure on Oat Street. Alternatively, the same could be achieved by extending the two-way section along Chapel Street itself. Either way, I think that minimising the amount of traffic which needs to use Oat Street will be worthwhile.

The Olympics – a brief summary for the non-sporty types

Don’t really care about sport? Secretly relieved that the Olympics are all over? But still want to appear knowledgeable to your friends? Here’s a brief summary of what happened…

Overall, we won lots of gold medals. More than Russia, who beat us last time and, rather more importantly, a lot more than Australia. OK, so China and the USA did better than us, but they do have a lot more people to choose from.

The British winners were a mixed bag. One guy named Mo won two gold medals, while four guys named Andy, Pete, Tom and Alex won one gold between them. One girl named Jess competed in seven events to get one gold. That seven-event medal was for the heptathlon; all the “athlon”s are multi-sport events. We also won gold in the men’s triathlon (that’s “tri” meaning “three”), but didn’t win the decathlon (“deca” = 10) or pentathlon (“penta” = 5, as in pentangle), although we did get a silver. In case you’re wondering, there are no other athlons in the summer Olympics. The winter version has a biathlon, but there’s no quadrathlon, hexathlon, octathlon or nonathlon.

Our first gold medal was won by women reversing. Our last gold medal was won by a big bloke punching someone. It’s nice to know that stereotypes can be partly overcome.

In between that, the chap with sideburns who won the French cycling race won a gold medal as well. In other bicycle races, we won gold medals in Keirin and Omnium as well as other things. Track cycling has funny names for events to disguise the fact that it’s basically all just going round and round a wooden oval lots of times. Although, as a nation, we do seem to be very good at it. It must be all that practice going through red lights.

You may recall that in the Wimbldeon final, the plucky Brit lost, as usual. But they gave him another go at the Olympics and he won it this time.

We also won golds in horse dancing, messing about in boats, clay pigeon shooting, women fighting and kicking your opponent in the head. All very British.

As far as competitors from other nations are concerned, the only ones you really need to care about are Michael Phelps, who swims very quickly and has lots of medals for it, and Usain Bolt, who – appropriately, for his name – runs very fast indeed. The Chinese did well in lots of tricky, technical sports like jumping into a pool and arty gymnastic stuff (although they were disqualified from the women’s badminton for, bizarrely, not trying hard enough to win) and the Americans did well in events where you simply have to be fast, such as running and swimming. The Russians, possibly a bit stereotypically, did well in events that require strength, like weightlifting and lobbing a heavy stone as far as possible. Australia did very well at coming second; they were the only nation to go home with more than twice as many silver medals as gold.

Aside the from the sport, the other big winners at the Olympics were Danny Boyle, who is widely tipped for a knighthood following the highly acclaimed opening ceremony that featured Shakespeare, JK Rowling, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, a flock of live sheep and those guys who wrote the song that goes “lager lager lager lager lager lager”; Boris Johnson, who managed to turn getting stuck on a zip wire into a PR triumph; and Eric Idle, who rescued an otherwise rather mediocre closing ceremony by falling out of a cannon. Non-sporting losers include David Cameron, who tried really, really hard to get some of Boris’s cool and failed every time; Kim Gavin, who dealt with the impossible task of living up to Boyle’s opener by seemingly scripting the closing ceremony while under the influence of mind-altering drugs; and the Spice Girls, who managed to be outshone by a display of synchronised taxi driving.

The BBC had a very good Olympics, so good in fact that the Director General told them to stop it and revert to type. In the US, NBC managed a monumental cock-up of the whole thing. The Australian networks pretended that gold medals don’t matter when you’ve got soap operas. And, despite the fact that ambush marketing was outlawed by some of the most pointlessly draconian legislation ever passed in the UK, bookmakers Paddy Power stuck two fingers up to the rules in a delightfully cheeky set of adverts. All in all, a very good two and a bit weeks. And, just to stop being funny for a moment, this picture shows why the Olympics matter, even if you absolutely hate sport:

This used to be my playground

When I was a child, this was where I went when I wanted to be on my own. A walk along the edge of open fields leads to a track which crosses the railway line and gives access to an area of uncultivated wetland known as Botany Bay (or, as we children invariably called it, “Botney”, omitting the second syllable and the second word). This photo is taken from just the other side of the railway, looking back towards it. Off to the left as you look at it is the sluicegate which terminates the stub of Lakenheath Lode and allows access to the wetland proper, while behind me as I took this, the path continues to another bridge across into the marsh.

I could, and often did, spend all day there on a summer Saturday or during the school holidays. When I got older I’d take the boat out on the river, rowing alongside the poplar plantations in Joist Fen.

Some things have changed since I lived there. The poplars have gone, to be replaced partly by farmland and partly by a nature reserve. The farm track which crosses the railway has been downgraded to a footpath with stiles instead of gates either side of the line. A solitary wooden plank which acted as a footbridge across one of the drainage dykes has been upgraded to a proper steel bridge with handrails. The bridge cross the Lode into the wetland is also just a footbridge now. And, because none of these tracks carry farm traffic any more, everything is more overgrown. But, otherwise, it’s all very much the same.

There wasn’t anything particularly unusual about this visit; I’ve been back several times since moving away and, while infrequent, I still like to take a walk in my old stamping grounds when I can. This time, I went over with my brother so that he could show me his small fleet of boats that he hires out to customers at his camping and caravan site. But what made it different is that this was the first time that I’d taken Ellie, my eldest daughter, with me. On the way back, she tugged my arm and said “Dad, this place is really beautiful”.

“I know”, I said. “This is where I grew up, and I used to come over here a lot”.

“Wow”, she responded. “You must have been really lucky to have a place like this”.

She’s right, of course, although at the time I didn’t appreciate it that much – it was just what I was used to. I don’t yet know what Ellie’s favourite places will turn out to be – she’s still only 5, which is a bit younger than I was when I first discovered Botany Bay – but I hope that when she’s the age I am now, she has as many good memories of them as I do.

TPS complaints – roll of dishonour

I got an unsolicited sales call this evening. Since we’re registered with the TPS, that’s illegal. So I decided to report them via the online complaint form.

In the course of filling in the form I noticed that when it reached the section where I had to give the name of the offending caller it was using a bit of “search as you type” Javascript to auto-complete the form with names matching what I’d typed so far. And the company I was complaining about was one of the suggested names.

Apart from the fact that this is a useful piece of code that makes completing the form easier, it also confirms that they’ve been the subject of previous complaints. Otherwise, there would be no reason for them to be in the auto-complete list.

So it occurred to me to go another step further. What if I could see the full list of names used in the auto-complete? Right-click, select ‘view source’, a quick glance through the HTML and yes, there’s the location of the underlying search page. Open it separately in a new browser tab, and it turns out to be a simple text list of all the names. No server-side processing at all, it’s completely client-side and all the data is downloaded by the browser as you complete the form.

So, what’s in it? At the moment, this is the list:

1 SOLAR ENERGY
1 STOP MARKETING SOLUTION
118 INTERNET DIRECTORY
121 CUSTOMER INSIGHT
1ST ASSIST
1ST CLAIMS SOLUTIONS
1ST QUOTE INSURANCE
1ST STOP FINANCE LTD
2 TOUCH
21 DIGITAL SIGNAGE
24 TALK
24/7 PC CARE
360 ETECH SUPPORT
365 SOLUTION
3D MARKETING GROUP
A.O.L
AA
AA INSURANCE SERVICES
ABSOLUTE INSULATION LTD
ABSOLUTE SAVINGS CENTRE
ACTIVE HEALTH MOBILITY
ADMIRAL GROUP PLC
AFFINION INTERNATIONAL
AFFINITY WILLS LTD
AGH WORLDWIDE
ALBERT HOLMES
ALLIANCE & LEICESTER PLC
ALLIANZ CORNHILL
ALLIANZ DIRECT
ALTERNATIVE ROUTE FINANCE
ALTODIGITAL UK LTD
AMBER WINDOWS
AMERICAN EXPRESS
ANDERSON BEARD
ANECO
AOL LIMITED
APR SERVICING
AQUATECH UK
ARBUTHNOT LATHAM
ARC EQUITIES
ASG MIDLANDS
ASHLEY BROWN FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS
ASIAN EXPRESS NEWSPAPER
ASTUTE LTD
ATC MEDIA LTD
ATHONA
AUSTIN CLARK RECRUITMENT
AUSTIN FRASER LTD
AUTO TRADER
AUTOCONTENT
AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
AUTONET INSURANCE GROUP
AUTONET INSURANCE SERVICES
AUTOTRADER
AVIVA PLC
AYJAY DIRECT MARKETING LTD
BAINES AND ERNST
BARCLAYCARD
BARCLAYS
BARING INSULATION
BARNARDOS
BD RECRUITMENT LTD
BDS MORTGAGE GROUP
BETFAIR
BETTER HOMES PROCLAD
BILL CUTTER
BIO PARTNERS LTD
BLUE SKY FINANCIAL CLAIMS
BLUEWATER HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BOND PARTNERS
BRITISH CONSUMERS
BRITISH GAS
BT CUSTOMER STREET
BUPA
BURNHILL LAND INVESTMENTS
BUSINESS ADVISORY SERVICE
BUSINESS PHONES DIRECT
C R SMITH GLAZIERS (DUNFERMLINE) LTD
CALL CONNECTION LTD
CANCER RESEARCH UK
CAP ONE
CAPITAL 1
CAPITAL ONE
CAR PROTECT
CARAVAN GUARD INSURANCE
CARBON EQUITIES
CARD PROTECTION PLAN
CARD SAVE
CARELINE SERVICES LTD
CARILLION ENERGY SERVICES
CARLTON FUELS
CARTRIDGE WORLD
CAS MEDIA
CASTLE COVER
CCA INTERNATIONAL UK LTD
CELLCOM COMMUNICATIONS LTD
CENTO CLIENT REVIEW
CENTRAL CAPITAL LIMITED
CENTRAL CLAIMS GROUP
CENTURY LAND GROUP
CETAFONE
CHAMELEON TELESALES LTD
CHANCE CURTIS
CHASE TEMPLETON LTD
CHILDREN IN CRISIS
CHRISTIAN AID
CHRISTIES KITCHENS (UK) LIMITED
CHURCHWOOD FINANCIAL
CIA INSURANCE SERVICES LIMITED
CICADA INVESTMENTS LIMITED
CLAIM PROFESSIONALS
CLARITY
CLARITY EMPLOYMENT FOR BLIND PEOPLE
CLEAN GREEN UPGRADES
CLEAR CONTACT
CLICK CONNECT
CLICK FINANCIAL LTD
CLIENT CONNECTION LTD
CLOSE CREDIT MANAGEMENT LTD
CLUB LA COSTA (UK) PLC
COCA COLA ENTERPRISES
COLT TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMANTRA
COMFOMATIC LTD
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE DIRECT INS SERV LTD
COMPARE THE MARKET.COM
CONSERVATION CARBON CREDITS
CONSORTIUM RECLAIM
CONSUMER LIFE STYLES
CONSUMER LIFESTYLES
CONSUMER MONEY MATTERS
CONTINENTAL TELECOM LTD
CONVERSO CONTACT CENTRES
CO-OPERATIVE BANK PLC
CPM
CPM UK LTD
CPP GROUP
CR SMITH
CREAM PUBLISHING LTD
CREDIT SAFE
CRISIS
CURVED AIR MARKETING SOLUTIONS LTD
DAISY COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED
DALESMAN PUBLISHING CO LTD
DASH TELECOM
DATA LOCATOR GROUP
DATA LOCATOR LTD
DEBENHAMS
DEBT ADVISORY LINE
DEBT CORRECT LTD
DEBT FREE HELPLINE LTD
DEBT MADE SIMPLE
DEBT MATTERS
DEBT SOLVE DIRECT
DEBT SURVIVAL (UK) LIMITED
DEBTCORRECT LIMITED
DEBTMATTERS
DENNIS PUBLISHING
DIGITAL MAINTENANCE LTD
DIGITAL SERVICES (UK) LTD
DIMENSION SECURITIES
DIRECT DEBT SOLUTIONS
DIRECT DIALOGUE
DIRECT FUELS
DIRECT RESPONSE
DIRECT SAVE TELECOM
DISCOVER FINANCE
DISTRIBUTION VERIFICATION SERVICES
DIVA TELECOM LTD
DLG
DM DESIGNS
DNA INSURANCE
DOCKLANDS TELECOM CENTER
DOG TRUST
DOMESTIC & GENERAL
DOMESTIC AND GENERAL INSULATION LTD
DOUBLE TAKE STUDIOS
DREAMWELL LTD
DRU YOGA
DTC Direct
DTD EUROPEAN SERVICES LTD
DUNN & BRADSTREET
DUNRAVEN WINDOWS
DUOTOOL LTD
E.D.F
EASY TALK
ECO GLOBAL MARKETS
ECO HOME SERVICES LTD
EDF
EDF ENERGY
E-GLAZE
ELM LEGAL SERVICES
Elswood Associates
ELSWORTH ASSOCIATES LTD
ELUCIDATE CONTRACTOR SERVICES (ECS) LTD
EMAX GROUP T/A EMAX COMMUNICATIONS
EMC ADVISORY SERVICES LTD
EMMAS DIARY
EMS INTERNET LTD
ENDSLEIGH INSURANCE SERVICES LTD
ENERGY HELPLINE
ENERGY LINKS HOME SAVE
ENTERPRISE CLEANING
ENVIRO ASSOCIATES
ENVIROSELECT
ENVIROSOLAR
EON
ESB INDEPENDENT ENERGY
ESURE
ESURE INSURANCE LTD
ETHICALL LTD
EURODEBT FINANCIAL SERVICES
EUROMEDIA ASSOCIATES LTD
EUROPEAN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS LTD
EUROPLAS LTD
EUROSEAL WINDOWS
EVEREST
EVERGOOD ASSOCIATES
EVERYDAY FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS
EVOLVE TELECOM
EXCELL CONTACT CENTRES
EXCHANGE ENTERPRISE LTD
EXIMIUS SOCIAL CARE
EXPERIENCES CONNECT LTD
EXPERTO CREDITE
EXPRESS GIFTS LTD
EXPRESS LAW
EXTEND A ROOM LTD
EYG
EZE TALK LTD
FASCIA DIRECT
FEATURE HOMES
FINE WINES OF THE WORLD
FINISHING TOUCHES
FIRST ASSIST GROUP LTD
FIRST CALL
FIRST CHOICE HOME IMPROVEMENTS
FIRST CLAIMS SOULUTIONS
FIRST FOUND
FIRST FOUND
FIRST NATIONAL BANK PLC
FIRST QUOTE INSURANCE
FIRST SOLAR ENERGY
FIRST STEP FINANCE
FIRST STOP FINANCE LTD
FIRSTASSIST GROUP LTD
FIRSTFOUND
FLAGSHIP MEDIA GROUP LTD
FONE HOUSE
FONEHOUSE
FOXY COMMUNICATIONS
FRANKLINCOVEY EUROPE LTD
FREEMANS PLC
FRESH START
FRESH START LIVING
FRIDAY AD LTD
FULCRUM MEDIA
FUNDRAISING INNOVATIONS LTD
FUTURE HOMES
GCS RECRUITMENT LTD
GEMS HYGIENE SUPPLIES DIRECT
GENESIS ACCIDENT CLAIMS
GIANT GROUP PLC
GILT EDGE PROMOTIONS LTD
GIORDANO UK DIRECT
GMAC RESIDENTIAL FUNDING
GRADWELL
GRAPEVINE GROUP
GRATTAN
GREEN PLANET INVESTMENT
GREENPEACE UK LTD
GROLIER BOOKS
GROVE COMMUNICATIONS
GUIDE DOGS FOR THE BLIND ASSOCIATION
GYM CO UK
HALO MOBILE
HAMILTON BLAKE
HAMMER PROPERTIES
HAMPSHIRE WILDLIFE TRUST
HAQ PUBLISHING LTD
HARRINGTON BROOKS
HASTINGS DIRECT
HAVEN POWER LTD
HEALTHYDAYS LIMITED
HEATH LAMBERT GROUP
HELP PC ONLINE LTD
HIDDEN HEARING LTD
HOME FIX 247
HOME SERVICE (GB) LTD
HOMEGUARD DIRECT
HOMESERVE
HORIZON FINANCE
HOT HOUSE ROOF & ENERGY
HYPE BRANDING
IDEAL CLEANING SERVICES
IDEAL HOMES
IDEAL SOLAR ENERGY
INSIDE TRACK
JD WILLIAMS
JUMP UP MEDIA
KAFEVEND GROUP LTD
KALEIDOSCOPE
KINGFISHER TELECOM
LA RADOUTE
LARKIN WINDOWS
LIFESTYLE CLAIMS LTD
LIFESTYLE GROUP
LINK FINANCIAL SERVICE
LISTEN UK
LITTLEWOODS GROUP
LOGIN4SPEED
LOVE FILM UK LTD
LOWRI BECK SERVICES
LYONS DAVIDSON
MAKE MY HOLIDAYS
MARCHES ENERGY AGENCY
MARK INSULATION LIMITED
MATCHTECH GROUP
MONEY HEALTH CHECK
MORTGAGE ADVICE SERVICES
MORTGAGE MATTERS
MOTORWAY DIRECT WARRANTY
MY HOUSE GROUP
N.POWER
NATIONAL TRUST
NATIONWIDE ENERGY SERVICES
NO WORRIES LOANS
NORTON FINANCE (UK) LTD
NPOWER
NSQUARED CREATIONS LIMITED
NUNWOOD CONSULTING LTD
OASIS
ON GUARD 24
ONE TWO ONE CUSTOMER INSIGHT
ONLINE PC MASTERS
OPAL TELECOM
OPTICAL EXPRESS LIMITED
OPUS TELECOM LTD
ORANGE
OTTO UK
OXFAM
PAYDAY UK
PENICUIK HOME IMPROVEMENTS
PHOENIX INSURANCE
PHONE HOUSE
PITNEY BOWES LIMITED
PITNEY BOWES LTD
PLUSNET
POWERGEN
PREMIUM STAR LTD
PROMISE FINANCE
PRS FOR MUSIC
PURPLE PIG CLAIMS
QUICK QUID
QUICKQUID
READERS DIGEST
REDRESS CLAIMS
RESPONDEZ
RIGHT TO HEALTH
ROYAL & SUN ALLIANCE PLC
ROYAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND
RSPCA
SAFE STYLE
SAFESTYLE UK
Sanderson Blinds
SAVE THE CHILDREN
SCOTTISH AND SOUTHERN ENERGY
SCOTTISH POWER
SENIOR RESPONSE LTD
SERIF (EUROPE) LTD
SHINE TELECOM LTD
SHOP DIRECT HOME SHOPPING LTD
SKY TELEVISION
SOLATRICITY LTD
SPACE DESIGNS
SPACE KITCHENS
ST JOHN SECURITY INSTALLATIONS LTD
STERLING INSURANCE GROUP
STIRLING HEALTH
SUMMIT ROOFGUARD
SUPREME O GLAZE LTD
SUPREMOGLAZE
SWIFTCOVER INSURANCE
SWITCH GAS AND ELECTRIC
SYGMA BANK UK
TALK MOBILE
TALK TALK
TALK TALK BUSINESS
TALK TALK MOBILE
TALKNTALK3
TAMESIDE INSULATIONS
TAMESIDE INSULATIONS
TELEGEN UK LTD
TELEPERFORMANCE UK
THAMESIDE INSULATION
THE BOTTOM LINE (GB) LIMITED
THE CUSTOMER ADVICE CENTRE
THE LISTENING COMPANY
THE MONEY GROUP LTD
THE MONEY MANAGER GROUP
THE WHEELIE BIN & WINDOW CLEANING COMPANY
THOMAS SANDERSON BLINDS LTD
THOMSON DIRECTORIES LTD
THUS PLC
TIMESHARE RESALES CONSUMERS ASSOCIATION
TISCALI UK LTD
TOP SPOT MARKETING LTD
TOUCAN CLAIMS
TRANSNATIONAL CORP LTD
TRUST INHERITANCE
TSC
TSC TELEMARKETING LTD
TUCAN CLAIMS
TULIP (UK) LTD
TV PROTECT
TW0 TOUCH
TWENTY FOUR TALK
UK TODAY
UKML
VACATION CLUB 4U
VANQUIS BANK LTD
VIEWLINE NORTHWEST LIMITED
VIKING DIRECT
VINANCE PLC
VITAMINS DIRECT LTD
VOICE MARKETING LIMITED
VONAGE UK
W.D.S. ASSOCIATES
WADE AND CO FINANCIAL CLAIMS MANAGEMENT
WDS ASSOCIATES
WE CLAIM U GAIN LTD
WE FIGHT ANY CLAIM
WEATHERSEAL HOME IMPROVEMENTS
WIGHT CABLE LTD
WORKWEAR EXPRESS LTD
WORLD VILLAGES FOR CHILDREN
WORLD VISION
XLN TELECOM LTD
XPRESSION WEB SOLUTIONS
ZEBRA MONEY MANAGEMENT

In total, there are 440 entries in this list. The names range from well-known, generally reputable companies through charities to obvious scammers and shysters. I’ll leave it to you to decide which category each of them falls into, but I was amused by the fact that the alphabetical listing puts “WE CLAIM U GAIN LTD” next to “WE FIGHT ANY CLAIM”. There would be a certain amount of poetic justice if those two ended up battling each other over a claim brought for breach of the TPS.

Even allowing for the fact that some complaints will be misdirected or spurious, though, this is still an excellent list of companies that probably don’t deserve to get your business. Stick with suppliers who advertise their wares and services legally.